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  • Pond filtration - nitrate filtration

    Good day All,

    Could somebody please tell me how to take care of nitrates in my pond

    Preferable using a tried and tested DIY filter design. Drawing would be nice.

    Thank you.
  • #2

    There are only a couple of ways to get rid nitrates/NO3...dilution is the simplest one, lots of water changes...2nd a ton of plants and all the hassle that goes with them..the 3rd is de-nitrification and not really a great thing is a backyard puddle....

    change water

    Comment

    • #3

      There is no silver bullet filter that will end up giving you zero nitrates...unless you plan on nuking the water with ozone (O3), which is definitely not cheap nor recommended.

      So need a different balance between the load (number/size of fish, amount of food being fed), filtration (pressurized, non pressurized chambers, wet/dry..etc), aeration (you want saturation for the temp), and water changes. As Graham was point at....dilution is the solution to pollution. Doing the other things can slow down the accumulation of pollution. But ultimately nothing reduces pollution like a good old fashioned water change. Plan on at least 10% a week.
      Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

      Comment

      • #4

        Anoxic filtration is the way to for nitrates to be converted, Syd Michell K.O.i. has come really good articles on this method of filtration. The oxygen molecule is stolen from nitrate in the filter system and then is gassed off. The nitrate is converted from N3 to N2.

        Comment

        • #5

          I remember when Dr. Kevin Novak introduced anoxic filtration at a Koi Health Seminar many years ago. We all looked at each other and wondered why he doesn't just do a water change and solve so many more pollution problems besides Nitrates....which are a small problem. I am not about to give away square meters of yard or filter pit for anoxic baskets that could be better used for other things. Ask yourself how many producers of the finest koi in the world in Japan get by without anoxic baskets?
          Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

          Comment

          • #6

            Their are many methods to reduce nitrates

            Water changes are one way to knock nitrates back.
            Ozone will help amonia, nitrites, and nitrates 260-320mv
            Some keepers do not have water that can be wasted down the drain(water meter police). Some keepers do a 800 gal,waterchange on 23,900gal/day

            Comment

            • #7

              Water changes are one way to knock nitrates back.
              Yes, that is the way Mother Nature deals with it in an open system. If I wee do expensive O3, I would be dialing in 350mV on the controller and have serious aeration...just in case. As it is my pond's nitrate level is usually 40ppm or less. I would not be too worried about nitrate unless the level was in the 80ppm range or higher and started that way. Then some special action would be a good idea to prevent long term stress.
              Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

              Comment

              • #8

                ozone equipment purchase can off set one vet bill with injections. I have found some fish are just sickly just like people. Ozone kills bacteria, virus, parisites, attacks ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. If o.r.p. is set too high koi can be dammaged over the long run by burning their gills. How o3 is introduced is very bad if it'still introduced with air stone directly. Mixing in a camber or a venturi with adequate piping so the o3 can gas off and koi do not get direct contact. I have seen ulcers heal, a series of bacterial infections go away with o3. Also have seen some fish only survive with heavy o3 and fall apart in a community environment with o3 present. I believe the fish don't know any better and will gulp bubbles their by burning their gills. Every living organism benifits by the additional 02 after 03 is finished oxidizing matter.

                Comment

                • #9

                  ozone equipment purchase can off set one vet bill with injections. I have found some fish are just sickly just like people. Ozone kills bacteria, virus, parisites, attacks ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. If o.r.p. is set too high koi can be dammaged over the long run by burning their gills. How o3 is introduced is very bad if it'still introduced with air stone directly. Mixing in a camber or a venturi with adequate piping so the o3 can gas off and koi do not get direct contact. I have seen ulcers heal, a series of bacterial infections go away with o3. Also have seen some fish only survive with heavy o3 and fall apart in a community environment with o3 present. I believe the fish don't know any better and will gulp bubbles their by burning their gills. Every living organism benifits by the additional 02 after 03 is finished oxidizing matter.

                  Comment

                  • #10

                    Originally posted by MCA View Post
                    I remember when Dr. Kevin Novak introduced anoxic filtration at a Koi Health Seminar many years ago. We all looked at each other and wondered why he doesn't just do a water change and solve so many more pollution problems besides Nitrates....which are a small problem. I am not about to give away square meters of yard or filter pit for anoxic baskets that could be better used for other things. Ask yourself how many producers of the finest koi in the world in Japan get by without anoxic baskets?
                    A properly working anoxic system definitely reduces nitrate levels in the pond. At 3% daily water change, I can manage to have nitrates go down to 10 ppm. In my j-mat system before I converted, I'd be happy to get 40ppm with same water change frequency and volume. As in any filter setup, fines management is an issue. If fines are allowed to accumulate for too long, the biofiltration capability can be impaired, not just with nitrates, but also with ammonia and nitrites. In this aspect, j-mats are more forgiving. With fines properly managed and controlled though, these drawbacks of anoxic filtration are addressed.

                    It can't be argued that users of anoxic filtration can't raise finest koi. It's easier to argue that anoxic filtration is relatively new, that changing to a newer system is challenging for most people. Since most purveyors of new technology tend to be dealers, dealers won't push new technology if there's no money in it for them. Anoxic filtration, as Rob pointed out, is a DIY-capable system, and most dealers, and breeders, like Momotaro, really don't think it makes business sense for them to stab themselves in the back.

                    Comment

                    • #11

                      What new technology? there is nothing new in anoxic filtration. There are no new media, chambers, magic bottled potion....etc. This is simply a technique, actually a filter design concept, that relives on omni present bacteria to work in relatively low oxygen zones to do denitrification. If there is anything new in this, someone show me a new patented product. You can get the same from stacking up Cermedia blocks in a chamber as they point out on their website.

                      MarinePure� Technical Information See tables for Nitrification and Denitrification.


                      Personally I don't need my pond nitrates at ~0ppm. Nitrates are just one type of pollution in a closed pond system. Water changes are the only solution to such pollution. Filtration and aeration simply buy us time and slow the decline of water quality.
                      Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

                      Comment

                      • #12

                        The key word here is "relatively," just in case you missed it, Mike. There's no need for a patent to be considered new either. And the technique, as you would call it, didn't just come out of thin air. It is the application of a biofiltration method as found in nature- in pond bottoms, for example- into our man-made pond and aquarium systems, which offers less nitrate by-product. As I understand it, Kevin Novak developed the system, and he didn't want to patent it, and so it is now in the public domain.

                        That you don't need as much water to be changed to maintain a desired target of nitrate concentration is a big plus. How much water you decide to change is up to the pond owner's own discretion, and in no way does that freedom reflect poorly on the anoxic filtration system. If you are putting too much focus on the danger of not making water changes, you are missing the point entirely.

                        In case you are not aware, places abound hat put great importance on conserving water. For them, I could see the use of an anoxic filtration system to be a boon. No surprise here.

                        Comment

                        • #13

                          Good day
                          Have you gentlemen seen the drawings of a nitrate filter in Peter Waddingtons book, Koi Kichi published in 1995.

                          Page 60

                          Garfield

                          Comment

                          • #14

                            Indeed a classic trickle tower such as in Clarity and many DIY designs.


                            "Once again, the problem of nitrates seldom affects the vast majority of Koi ponds and very few would have to consider incorporating this type of unit, I have included this for the benefit of a minority of readers."

                            Koi Kichi, Peter Waddington, 1995, Page 60

                            I had not gotten out our autographed copy in years. It was good to dust it off. So much in that book is still spot on. The big advances since 1995 have been in mechanical stage with sieves and RDFs plus the use of showers for bio. If only we could get koi keepers to read and understand this one book before they put shovel to ground. Thanks for the reminder!!!
                            Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

                            Comment

                            • #15

                              Originally posted by coolwon View Post
                              Good day
                              Have you gentlemen seen the drawings of a nitrate filter in Peter Waddingtons book, Koi Kichi published in 1995.

                              Page 60

                              Garfield
                              Presumable the Pro's are. We reduce the amount of Nitrates in the pond.

                              What would the Con's be?

                              Comment

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