Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

what can i use as a filter pad

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • what can i use as a filter pad

    i have this 100 gallon rubbermaid stock tank and i want to turn it into a filter. could i beable to use like a large blanket made out of polyester and on the inside of it having that polyester stuffing? and just stuff the stock tank with it? if not what can i use as a filter pad
  • #2

    I would avoid that if you don't want to produce a giant crap-trap teabag to make you water full of anerobic bacteria.

    Much better would be to make something in the form of a static kaldness prefilter. I've seen many made of buckets and tubs.

    B.Scott
    Semper in excreta, sumus solum profundum variat

    Comment

    • #3

      Got to agree with B Scott on the polyfill matting. It is great for filtering out "fines", but plugs up easily and is a pain to clean. I have a tub filter similar to what you describe with coarse Jmat and open weave polyethylene (produce bags) hanging in curtains. Kaldness would be a better choice though.
      Larry Iles
      Oklahoma

      Comment

      • #4

        how bout a furnace filter pad for mechanical and lava rocks for bio filtration?

        Comment

        • #5

          K.K., you are missing the point. Of course these things will strain out the crap but they then become an almost uncleanable source of bacteria that will cause your koi nothing but grief and illness. Take my word for it. Get yourself an easy pod or build your own static K filter. Easy peasy to throw together and they work great.

          B.Scott
          Semper in excreta, sumus solum profundum variat

          Comment

          • #6

            Definitely go static K1 for mechanical, fluid K1 for bio (and improved aeration) and lastly...go static K1. That last stage of static K1 should develp some bio capability and trap the fines that break lose from the fluid bed stage. The second stage is self cleaning. The first and third stages are cleaned by redirecting air to them (boiling them puppies!!!) and dumping the chamber.

            Even easier to clean than a dang bead filter!!!
            Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

            Comment

            • #7

              Another vote here for static Kaldnes filters for mechanical filtration. They are easy to build, very easy to clean and they do a great job. I hate filter mats with a passion. Forget the blanket idea. Quilt batting stops up with algae and is impossible to clean well. Static k1 filters are so easy to clean you don't even have to get your hands wet! Filter brushes are also pretty good for mechanical filtration and are easier than matting to clean.

              Comment

              • #8

                Bumpity bump.

                Comment

                • #9

                  Okay I can get really, really, really bored sometimes...and I'm not an artist. I figure with a 100 gal. tank you should be able to make a combo static/moving bed filter using either K1 or bioflo 9. Without putting to much thought into it the tank could be divided into thirds, with 1/3 being static and 2/3 being moving bed. Here is a ruff drawing of what is floating around in my head. Oh, and I'm assuming you already have a bottom drain or skimmer this will run off.
                  Attached Files
                  Chris

                  Comment

                  • #10

                    Chris, love your air pump discription.
                    Steve
                    My Koi Pond
                    http://www.redroselofts.com/koi-pond.htm

                    Comment

                    • #11

                      Use Pvc shavings. I've used both floating media (Kaldness type) and PVC shavings and I like the shavings better. Lower cost, easy cleaning and if you spill it or need to remove it you can do it in seconds. It comes in three widths and the black is UV resistant.
                      I've also run it in tanks with airsones for better circulation in a bio tank and that works great too.
                      Attached Files

                      Comment

                      • #12

                        I don't know... Shaved PVC is going to be leaching loads of plastifiers into the water because of the larges surface area! I'd prefer polyethylene or polypropylene

                        B.Scott
                        Semper in excreta, sumus solum profundum variat

                        Comment

                        • #13

                          I've never heard of that before. I've used it for some time now with no problems and I know it's been used in aquaculture for some time. In the finer strands it's even used in water purifiction.

                          Comment

                          • #14

                            Still it is one of the down sides to using PVC in general. PVC needs plastifiers (phthalates) to keep it from becoming brittle. Notice that if you give an old piece of use PVC a whack with a hammer is splinters into 1000 bits. Try it with a new piece and the hammer will often just glance off it with not damage. The reason for this is the old piece has had a large amount of it's plastifiers leached from the pipe.

                            The compounds are not totally innocuous in as much as they act as a synthetic hormone in many vertebrates and can cause developmental problems in young animals. In a piece of pipe the exposure is limited to the inside of the pipe surface. But once you shave it up into little curls the surface area if increased buy a huge amount (which is exactly the reason you use it for filter media). This causes an exponential increase in the plasifiers. Although the toxicity of single large doses in adults are generally low the effect can be cumulative and the effect on young orginisums is hotly debated.

                            It's use in aquaculture most likely is due to the simple fact that it is dirt cheap. Tens of thousands of tons of disgarded PVC is submitted for recyling every year. Any use thay can find for it is usually most welcome.

                            B.Scott
                            Semper in excreta, sumus solum profundum variat

                            Comment

                            All content and images copyright of: Koi-bito.com
                            Working...
                            X